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Ellis Paul in Concert

  • November 22, 2019 - November 22, 2019
  • Location: Woody Guthrie Center
  • Venue: Woody Guthrie Center
  • Address: 102 Reconciliation Way, Tulsa, OK 74103
  • Times: Starting: 7:00 PM
  • Admission: $25
  • 918-574-2710
  • Visit Website
  • Free Parking?: No
  • Add to Itinerary

Ellis Paul returns to Tulsa with an intimate concert in the Woody Guthrie Center Theater. The show is set for 7 p.m. Nov. 22. Tickets are $25, available at my.woodyguthriecenter.org, by phone at 918-574-2710 or at the WGC front desk.

Tickets are available now to Woody Guthrie Center members, and go on sale to the public at 10 a.m. Aug. 26. To become a member of the Woody Guthrie Center, please call 918-574-2710.

Ellis will spend a week in Tulsa performing for students across the area, presenting songs from his work, "The Hero in You." To have Ellis perform at your school, please contact jerry@woodyguthriecenter.org.

About Ellis Paul

Ellis Paul is one of those gifted singer/songwriters. Though some may refer to him as a folksinger, he is more - for lack of a better word - a singular storyteller, a musician whose words reach out from inside and yet also express the feelings, thoughts and sensibilities that most people can relate to in one way or another, regardless of age or upbringing. The exhilaration of the open road. A celebration of heroes. The hope for redemption. Descriptions of those things that are both near and dear. The sharing of love..., intimate, passionate and enduring.

These are the scenarios that emerge from Ellis Paul's new album, Chasing Beauty, a set of songs which detail, in typical Paul fashion, stories of people and places that reflect larger truths about us all. "Kick Out the Lights (Johnny Cash)" pays tribute to that fearless American icon name-checked in its title. "Plastic Soldier" offers homage to a wounded soldier returning from Afghanistan. A real-life barnstorming pilot takes the spotlight in "Jimmie Angel's Flying Circus," while iconic Boston blue collar musician Dennis Brennan takes the focus in "Waiting on a Break." Even the Empire State Building and the Boston Red Sox get their due, via "Empire State" and "UK Girl (Boston Calling)," respectively.

In reality, these stories are a continuation of tales Paul has told for more than a quarter century, over the expanse of nineteen albums, numerous critical kudos (15 Boston Music Awards alone), inclusion in several movie soundtracks, and stages he's headlined both near and far. "I've got a car with over 4 75 ,000 miles on it, and it's my third road vehicle, " Paul declares. "I've been doing 200 shows a year for over twenty years. There isn't a town in the country where I won't find a friend. I'm a nomad. And I'm gonna write and play until I'm gone."

No doubt he will. Still, it's somewhat ironic that Paul gravitated towards this bigger world of intent and expression given that the place Paul considers his hometown these days isn't New York or Nashville, or Boston or Austin or Charlottesville, VA. where he lives, but rather Presque Isle, Maine, a tiny enclave surrounded by three rivers. Not surprisingly, the name translates to "almost an island." Presque Isle shares a vanishing tradition with many small towns these days, where family farms are giving way to industrializ ation and giant corporations, and earning a livelihood from the land is no longer the simple option it once was. Nevertheless, it's still a haven for traditional values and for people as real and authentic as the soil they once tilled. If there's one grace left to cling to, it's the grace of nature's beauty, sealed off by the surrounding mountains and fields.

Likewise, his geographical origins also couldn't have been further from the world at large. He was born in the dead of winter in the small town of Fort Kent, Maine, a place nestled right up next to the Canadian border. He came from humble origins, a family of potato farmers who could count among their forebears a veteran of the battle of Gettysburg, whose heroism on that field of honor earned him the 140 acres of Maine farmland that his descendants would continue to sow. It was the place that taught Paul the meaning of hard work and self-reliance, and the values that accompany as much drive and determination any individual could muster.